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Johnie
02-11-2010, 05:00 PM
Today is a mid term election here in the US. Lots and lots of very ugly political ads have been tearing up the airwaves.

I don't watch the news or read the newspaper much anymore since it is always depressing and sad. I live in a very "red" state, which means it is conservative and generally votes Republican. I hear lots of derisive things, especially about our current president. One of the things I heard yesterday truly sickened my soul :sorry: Today is supposed to be a very big day for voters. Yes, from Facebook statuses alone, I don't think many people are going to vote. I ALWAYS vote. It is the least I can do to have my voice heard in this country. Plus, too many women fought too long and hard for me not to vote. It would be shameful for me to do otherwise.

So, this got me thinking.....what do the polls look like in the UK? Do most vote? Are they apathetic like they are here? I read that Australia has compulsory voting. Mari, what about Mexico?

robertcraig
02-11-2010, 05:08 PM
I am afraid a lot of people in the uk dont vote at elections i am sorry your president is loosing his poularity i have a great respect for him

DisneyFreak
02-11-2010, 05:09 PM
I voted early on Saturday. Here in Florida there are some VERY IMPORTANT races for Governor and Senate. There were over 2 million people that voted early this election. About 1 million absentee ballots and 1 million people in person. That is up 65% since 2008.

Anyone that does not vote gives up their right to complain about anything that goes on. It's your constitutional right. GET OUT TO VOTE!!!

:thumbsup:

Johnie
02-11-2010, 05:10 PM
DisneyFreak, that is good to hear!!

robertcraig
02-11-2010, 05:27 PM
I voted early on Saturday. Here in Florida there are some VERY IMPORTANT races for Governor and Senate. There were over 2 million people that voted early this election. About 1 million absentee ballots and 1 million people in person. That is up 65% since 2008.

Anyone that does not vote gives up their right to complain about anything that goes on. It's your constitutional right. GET OUT TO VOTE!!!

:thumbsup: I agree you must vote i have voted in every election since i became old enough to vote

catrancher
02-11-2010, 05:55 PM
I voted this morning.

Although it sadly appears that most of the choices are the lesser of two evils rather than someone I'd really like to vote for.

Tom (:macwave:... disillusioned!)

Mari
02-11-2010, 07:18 PM
Over here it really depends on what type of election it is and who the candidates are...

Voting always takes place on Sundays, there is no sending your ballot in before time or anything.. you have to go to your voting place (usually at public schools) with a valid voting card which has to match the voters record .... yeah.. its complicated to vote, and thats because there are many many cheaters, people who vote for others, card stealing, etc.... not nice...

So.. you get your ballot, you walk into a booth and cross ... 1 ballot per position.. president, representatives, governors, etc.... no electronic ballots either...

Voting closes around 6 and then the votes get counted...


We also get lots of propaganda and millions of promises... funny thing though, once politicians are in power, they forget they were ever candidates and the promises they made...

I always vote, I think its my right, but also my responsibility, but not many people think like that...

kazzaqld
03-11-2010, 02:01 AM
Voting is compulsory in Australia, yes. But the fine is only about $20 so it's not overly punitive. Personally I think it has its good points and bad points. By making it compulsory the candidates don't have to spend much time or energy convincing people to turn up in the first place, but then you get plenty of apathetic people voting, and I'm not sure I like the idea of my government being decided by the apathetic!

Our elections are always held on Saturdays, polls open at 8am and close at 6pm, so that gives most people the opportunity to vote on the day. We also have some prepoll and postal voting opportunities. In some very remote communities, an electoral officer goes around with a mobile polling place.

We also have preferential voting, which is very good for minor parties. So for example I can vote for a Green candidate as my first preference but give my 2nd preference to a Labor candidate and my third to a Liberal and so on. It varies between State and Federal as to whether you have to fill out all the candidates or just fill in as many preferences as you like.

If no-one gets 50% of the primary vote, then the candidate who comes last gets their prefences distributed to the 2nd choice, then the 2nd last to the 2nd choice and so on till someone has 50%.

It's complicated but it's a good system I think.

I absolutely agree that it's a responsibility to vote and would definitely do so even if it weren't compulsory.

uscwest
03-11-2010, 11:23 AM
I really have to agree with Johnie over the very UGLY political ads on TV and Radio. Why can't people just stand up and say what they stand for and let us know what they will try to do to help rather than beating their opponents into the ground with mostly vicious, though not in all cases, lies.

Unfortunately we did not get out to vote yesterday. I got stuck in a meeting at work, didn't get home till late and we had a heating contractor waiting for us when we got home, because our heater isn't working. He wasn't able to repair it and it is going to cost over $1000 to fix. He had to order a part and it won't be in for 3-5 days and we are expecting cold and rain for the next few days. Really sorry I didn't get the chance to vote as the House of Representatives race in our district is VERY CLOSE right now.

DisneyFreak
03-11-2010, 12:31 PM
I really have to agree with Johnie over the very UGLY political ads on TV and Radio. Why can't people just stand up and say what they stand for and let us know what they will try to do to help rather than beating their opponents into the ground with mostly vicious, though not in all cases, lies.



Amen to that! They forget that the election is not about them or their opponent, it's about us!

catrancher
03-11-2010, 01:33 PM
It's kind of a shame that everyone heaves a monumental sigh of relief when the elections and runoffs are over since now they don't have to listen to anymore of those ridiculous, insulting political commercials on tv or have their dinner constantly interrupted with automated phone calls! :mad:

Tom (:macwave:... tired of politics and politicians!)

josh.p.
03-11-2010, 08:36 PM
I've seen a few of the US voting ads that where featured on ur news... The best was the "I am not a witch." one :rotfl:

Watching the news was quite interesting because it said that if republicans did 'get in' Obama would probably use it to his advantage at the presidential elections by playing the 'the republicans won't let me change what you want me to change' card.

I think we should have compulsory voting but with a 'none of the above' option to save apathetic voting. I voted for the first time this year and my main issue was higher education, tons of friends didn't vote and I think that's disgraceful.

I voted lib dem in the recent UK election and I'm never voting for them again. They promised to make higher education free/cheaper (although I did believe free would be detrimental and impossible, I thought it'd at least stay the same price) and it feels like Cable has given just given the student populace a huge middle finger.

MarkE
04-11-2010, 11:18 AM
I wouldn't say he has given them the finger - if they were in power I think they would have gone for lower fees and made the savings elsewhere, but the truth is they're just supporting the more popular and powerful conservatives, who wanted to increase the fees. This is just one (unfortunately big) area where they've had to concede ground.

Agreed that the Reds will now make it difficult for Obama, and I'm sure that can only be a bad thing for Americans - but good for us if it helps the exchange rate :)

I'm undecided whether Obama's doing well enough - but can't see where McCain could have done better...

As for the original question - campaigning is more 'pro your own party' as opposed to negative comments about others. There are occasional slanging matches, but they're the exception, not the norm.

DisneyFreak
04-11-2010, 12:27 PM
I'm undecided whether Obama's doing well enough - but can't see where McCain could have done better...



Not to get too political here but it would be difficult for anyone to fix, in just two years, what had been happening since the turn of the century.