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Kate
07-11-2010, 07:15 PM
So, if the chicken pox thing wasnt bad enough yesterday my nephew injured himself playing football 10 days before we go away. he went to the local hospital who said he'd snapped his ligaments and he can walk on it etc. Today he was in agony so went to A&E, after an xray (which the other hospital didnt do) he was told his ankle is broken in 2 places :sorry: he is absolutely gutted.

Will he still be able to do the coasters do you know? Its in a plaster cast now, mustve been awful for him walking on it like they told him to do :( Will he need to have special assistance or anything at the airport?

Any information is a huuuge help, he's so worried and got himself into such a state earlier, i feel so sorry for him!

Thank you!

mainecoon lover
07-11-2010, 07:24 PM
You will need to inform the airline and I would be requesting bulkhead seating. Unsure of the coasters I am afraid. I would be getting on of these so he can still shower and swim. They send them very quickly

Limbo Products - Home (http://www.limboproducts.co.uk/?gclid=CIfzle62j6UCFYxH4wodR1W_Nw)

Kate
07-11-2010, 07:46 PM
Thank you Michelle - will tell my brother to let virgin know :yes: Thanks for the link too, at least if he has one of those on he will be able to do some gentle water rides etc - assuming of course they let him

Kate
07-11-2010, 08:06 PM
"Attraction is not recommended for those wearing casts"

Does this mean, no you are not going on it - or does it mean we dont recommend it but go on it at your own risk?

DisneyFreak
07-11-2010, 08:31 PM
"Attraction is not recommended for those wearing casts"

Does this mean, no you are not going on it - or does it mean we dont recommend it but go on it at your own risk?

I read that as saying it is at your own risk.

Also, I would suggest getting wheel chair assistance at the airport and maybe look into renting one in the parks. Is he on crutches?

Kate
07-11-2010, 08:34 PM
He's on crutches :yes: we've all been trying to get him to see its not the end of the holiday and that its not going to spoil it at all, there are ways around things! We've mentioned the wheelchair to him aswell and he's ok with that if he needs one. My brother has ordered him one of those waterproof coverings aswell.

Wonderful timing eh?! :rolleyes:

josh.p.
07-11-2010, 11:02 PM
If I where him I'd try to go on one of the slower rides to see if you could cope OK. I don't think my feet ever move on rides so I'd assume he will be OK but not covered by insurance if anything happened on a ride?

uscwest
07-11-2010, 11:11 PM
I would be more concerned with the flight. Flying with a cast on can create problems with swelling. You need to talk not only to the airline but also the doctor.

Kate
08-11-2010, 07:45 AM
He's having the cast changed next week, going from one thats up to his knee down to a smaller one so i'll mention to my brother that he should speak to the dr about it re the flight

Dawn
08-11-2010, 08:04 AM
What John said about the flight - the airline may request that the cast be split before he flies to allow room for swelling. And ankles are the worst things for swelling on planes.

Kate
08-11-2010, 10:11 AM
What John said about the flight - the airline may request that the cast be split before he flies to allow room for swelling. And ankles are the worst things for swelling on planes.

is that something you need to find out before hand or something they will tell you at the airport? :unsure:

mainecoon lover
08-11-2010, 04:55 PM
I would ask the airline now and then speak to the consultant when they re-plaster. We were due to fly in 2000 when Beth got a fracture due to brittle bone. The consultants were more than happy for her to travel although happy to write a letter when we decided not to.

I think Josh makes a valid point about the rides and your travel insurance.

mainecoon lover
08-11-2010, 05:01 PM
I found this


Plaster Cast - If I have a broken limb with a plaster cast on, can I still fly?
Following the application of a plaster cast, the majority of airlines restrict flying for 24 hours on flights of less than 2 hours or 48 hours for longer flights. It is important that you obtain a letter confirming the date and time of application of the cast. The problem in flying, is that air may be trapped within and beneath the cast and may expand during flight. If, however, there is an urgent need for travel before these limits, the plaster cast may need to be split to accommodate any swelling. If a pneumatic splint is used, some air should be released to allow for gaseous expansion at altitude, which could cause discomfort and other problems.

Nowadays, “plaster” casts are increasingly made from a modern composite material rather than the Plaster of Paris that was previously used and in this case there may be less of a problem of the cast expanding in flight.

Soon after the injury or operation that has required the cast, the affected limb is more likely to swell; this is especially the case if you cannot raise the limb to reduce the swelling. Hence, you need to be more cautious if you have a leg in a cast rather than an arm.

FAQ Answer | Aviation Health Unit | Safety Regulation (http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=923&pagetype=70&gid=924&faqid=1081)

Kate
11-11-2010, 02:45 PM
That information was really useful Michelle, thank you!

Nephew went back to the hospital yesterday for a check up, they have put a smaller and lighter cast on his ankle and he has to go back next week for another xray and they will put a split in the cast for the flight. They have a letter on confirming the date etc the cast went on.