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Tink
22-04-2012, 07:14 PM
Herself and I will be going to Vancouver, BC this fall and then on a cruise to Alaska. As a result we'd like to purchase a new camera. I've tormented our Keith to death with questions and we've pretty much made the camera selection.

However, I still need some basic education.

What is RAW and how does it differ from JPEG? Should I be asking what JPEG is too? :unsure:

Let's start there, ok? :wiggle:

Britchick
22-04-2012, 07:23 PM
The scenery on that trip is going to be breathtaking!!!

simply, if you want technical ask Keith :tongue:


JPEG is a type of file which is the result of the camera processing the photo in camera. i.e. if you put the camera in auto it will work out what the best settings are for the photo being taken. Works most of the time but you have no control and the camera is fooled by certain circumstances.

RAW is as it says really the raw photo- no processing has been done by the camera, this means that you can manipulate the photo and process it yourself using a computer program.


RAW allows you to control the photo more BUT takes up a lot more space on the camera card/stick, i think it's about 3 times more space. I take photos both RAW and JPEG together as my camera allows this, if i like what the camera has done i will use the JPEG and delete the RAW but if something major needs changing i.e. if the exposure is out then i edit the RAW.

Does that help? which camera are you looking at?

Tink
22-04-2012, 08:18 PM
Canon EOS Rebel T3i...

Ummmm... I think I understand.

I'm the point and shoot sort, letting the camera do the work. I can manage a bit if it's fooled by something obvious.

Herself is the one with the talent and understanding. She has an old Canon (film) with a zoom lens that is a sin to waste, but it's an oldie.

So, off we go into the 21st century. I was happy with a nice point and shoot but she's always wanted an EOS.

The scenery is going to be phenomenal, isn't it? :yes: The eagles, whales, other birds, mountains... we do need something decent.

Britchick
22-04-2012, 08:52 PM
then that camera is perfect for both of you, you can put it on auto (shudder) or use one of the programmes according to what you're taking a photo of and herself can play with the fancy stuff. Perfect. PS make sure you both read the manual well before you go and practice. :happybounce:

Tink
22-04-2012, 09:33 PM
Yep, that's our usual way...read to the nth degree and discuss. LOL. I am an auto sort of person. I gave it a bit of a try to learn about photography with Herself's original Canon and I have to say it bored me to tears. I am NOT a patient person. The only patience in me is directed toward my residents. :D

Gadgets? They need to work with minimal fuss and NOW. :D :D

Britchick
22-04-2012, 10:16 PM
Maybe that's why I have no patience out of work lol

Tink
23-04-2012, 12:29 AM
OH! I thought of another question.

What does a "noisy picture" mean?

Britchick
23-04-2012, 06:34 AM
It looks quite speckly, I think electrons cause it. You can reduce it with an editing program. It happens when you up the ISO on the camera

Kate
23-04-2012, 10:45 AM
Im rubbish with manuals - they use another language to me!! I have a read through but i learn best on my own - unless i get really stuck then i ask on here!

I learnt the other day that if you are taking photos of scenery then the landscape setting should be used as it keeps the whole picture in focus, but i hadnt been doing that as i was using the ia setting which had been focussing on an object - which explains why alot of my photos werent as sharp as they couldve been :yes:

Beccaberry
23-04-2012, 12:12 PM
Think of the "auto" setting as training wheels for the lovely new bike you've purchased but aren't *quite* ready to ride on two wheels just yet. Auto will allow you to get where you're going, feel really great about the ride and enjoy the scenery along the way...all without being stressed out about falling or crashing :) As you gain more confidence and "play" around with settings, you can take the training wheels off and REALLY feel the wind in your hair :) The T3 will be a BRILLIANT camera to grow into! (Did Keith say whether you'd be able to use Herself's lens that she has for her film camera?)

One thing I've found helpful over the years....if I find myself in an unhurried spot (in other words, scenery or a static setting of some sort...or an event that will be going on for some time) I will take a load of shots initially on auto, to ensure that I've preserved the memory and then I'll switch over to manual and have a play. This way...I have some really nice shots to share with friends and family (us!) but I can also play around with different settings and compare them to see how a setting changes a photo. Does that make sense?

Can't wait for the photos!

keith
23-04-2012, 10:23 PM
One thing I've found helpful over the years....if I find myself in an unhurried spot (in other words, scenery or a static setting of some sort...or an event that will be going on for some time) I will take a load of shots initially on auto, to ensure that I've preserved the memory and then I'll switch over to manual and have a play. This way...I have some really nice shots to share with friends and family (us!) but I can also play around with different settings and compare them to see how a setting changes a photo. Does that make sense?
!

This is a REALLY great tip :yes: and is something I still do myself. I have my camera set to take auto JPGs so theyre "there" and will be fine and then once I've got those, I switch to a creative mode or manual and mess around usually taking those in RAW.

I haven't checked if herself's early film lens will work on the new one but if we find out exactly what lens it is, we can have a good look :) Even if it's pre eos there's a chance it may work with manual focus or with an adapter.

Tink
24-04-2012, 12:46 AM
It's definitely pre EOS. The sucker is huge!

Yes, Becca that makes great sense. Part of the reason I "fell off" of doing just that before was the film. At least with the digital it seem much easier to test shots. :yes:

I don't know if there is anything identifying on the old lens, but I'll have a look.

Watchinherskip
25-04-2012, 04:13 PM
Canon EOS Rebel T3i...

Ummmm... I think I understand.

I'm the point and shoot sort, letting the camera do the work. I can manage a bit if it's fooled by something obvious.

Herself is the one with the talent and understanding. She has an old Canon (film) with a zoom lens that is a sin to waste, but it's an oldie.

So, off we go into the 21st century. I was happy with a nice point and shoot but she's always wanted an EOS.

The scenery is going to be phenomenal, isn't it? :yes: The eagles, whales, other birds, mountains... we do need something decent.

Tink, you will have to hold back as you will most likely find photo ops at every turn. Whether it is salmon in the rivers of Ketchikan, Eagles above in Juneau, whales and sealions in Sitka, or the beautiful blue of the glaciers in the sound...you will be floored.

I think you will have a great camera with the EOS and will have some great shots when you get back.

FWIW...unless you are dumping to your laptop....buy extra memory cards (before you go as they get pricey in touristy places) oh and maybe an extra battery.

catrancher
25-04-2012, 04:44 PM
Tink,

FWIW - there's online video training available for your camera. One of the them is here (http://www.lynda.com/Home-Computing-Photography-tutorials/Shooting-with-the-Canon-Rebel-T3i-600D-and-Kiss-X5/86638-2.html) on Lynda.com. Here's others (http://lmgtfy.com/?q=canon+eos+rebel+t3i+online+training).

Just FYI.

Tom (:macwave:... video learning fan...)

Tink
26-04-2012, 07:45 AM
Thanks Dan and Tom! Great info!