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susanm
10-04-2013, 09:07 AM
Didnt see this post, but sorry if it is a duplicate. After visiting WDW with a deaf friend we got to see the interpreters at many shows/attractions. for those who did not know, WDW has a schedule, different days they are in different parks. there is also a set time they are at each show. For hearing disabled a schedule can be obtained about 2 weeks before you arrive so you know what park the interpreters are in. For those who just happen to catch a show, take a look at them. they are amazing. for the afternoon parades they stand across from HALL OF PRESIDENTS at the corner. these are some very talented people. there interpretation of the shows and attractions and parades are so amazing, even someone who does not know sign language will understand a lot of what is being interpreted. a quick look...check you tube for a few clips of the interpreters. i check them out now every time i go to WDW...

ps it has helped my personal skills too

Wendy
10-04-2013, 09:23 AM
I'm ashamed to say I have never seen them :sorry:

I am always amazed by people that can sign, it's a fantastic thing to be able to do, I will keep an eye out for them when we are there later this year.

Tink
10-04-2013, 09:44 AM
The best part of the Christmas Show in EPCOT is watching the ASL interpreters. :yes: (Candlelight Processional).

Interpreters must go to school, and learn to sign at a specific rate before they are certified. They are in high demand, and are quite difficult to locate for a small business who needs to use one (as I know from personal experience). I sign, and can therefore communicate with my staff that communicate in that manner, but I cannot sign and talk at the same time. So, when I conduct meetings or educational trainings, I prefer to use an interpreter. It's nearly impossible to book one. :sigh:

ASL is a complex language with its own grammar and syntax. There is a different language for signing in each country. The interpreters at WDW are signing in American Sign Language, which differs from British Sign Language, Spanish Sign, Brazilian sign... you get the idea. :yes:

uscwest
10-04-2013, 11:17 AM
We have a deaf person in our office. When we have scheduled meetings, as long as he knows enough in advance, he can normally find an interpreter. It is the impromptu meetings that cause problems. Fortunately he can normally read lips from up close so one of us can get the gist of the message across to him.

Beccaberry
10-04-2013, 11:35 AM
One of my "bucket list" items...I've always wanted to learn to sign...I find it to be a beautiful language.

Aside from the CP, as Tink mentioned, I don't think I've ever noticed an interpreter at Disney...I shall have to go take a peek at YouTube! Thanks for the information, Susan!

susanm
10-04-2013, 11:41 AM
if you see a clip on youtube from semiltimo that was mine from last summer... i have been signing for years.. i can communicate with all the deaf people i work with and have become , over the years, friends with them outside of work. ASL takes a long time ... learning the words is easy...but i have finally got the hang of it.. i originally wanted to be an interpreter for disney...and was willing to take (very very expensive) the RID (REGISTRY OF INTERPRETERS) test...but now you must have a bachelors degree before you can take the test...and at 60 yrs old i am just to old to go back full time to college... :shrug1: but hoping some day i can work in guest services...that i could use the skill i have..

ps after visiting 2x with a deaf friend i wrote to MARK JONES who is the head of the dept and suggested maybe to have an interpreter at guest services when the park opens...so the deaf can make dining arrangements, ask questions, get schedules etc. i noticed they now do that... WAY TO GO MARK AND DISNEY FOR PAYING ATTENTION TO THE GUESTS..

Britchick
10-04-2013, 04:36 PM
We 'followed' the interpreters round in December at animal kingdom, they were amazing and out so much effort in, I really enjoyed watching them. I would love to learn to sign too, one day!

Suebeattie
10-04-2013, 08:24 PM
I know its not the same but my son loves watching justin fletcher and mr tumble - he does a 15 mimute show on cbeebies which has signing in it. It fasinates me and sits there waving and absorbing it all.
My nephew loves watching it too and knows loads of signs from it and to be honest I sit there copying the signs as well lol.
Apparently babies can learn signs alot quicker than actual words. I wish I had done baby sign classes with zac.
It is very fasinating how people adapt and learn to communicate in other ways.

:wiggle:

Vikki
10-04-2013, 08:40 PM
Ava just loves Mr Tumble! He does makaton rather than sign language - which is what they do at baby signing. It's much more practical and realistic. I did baby signing with Ben and also used it with Ava, it's really good!

Beccaberry
10-04-2013, 10:35 PM
Our preschool level students learn basic signing - it changes to French or Spanish as they move ahead in school...but they pick it up SO quickly!

Tink
11-04-2013, 12:45 AM
Because it is a bona fide language. The LAD is still highly functional in young children. That's why they learn languages so much more easily than do adults. :yes:

And, for the record. 60 is not too old to return to college! :D :D

Britchick
11-04-2013, 05:05 AM
Because it is a bona fide language. The LAD is still highly functional in young children. That's why they learn languages so much more easily than do adults. :yes:

And, for the record. 60 is not too old to return to college! :D :D


I seem to remember its optimal for language until 11 or 12 years old, that's why we should be teaching our primary /elementary school children languages rather than waiting

Tink
11-04-2013, 07:17 AM
Yes! Our ease at learning new language starts to slow down in early to mid teens. We can of course still learn after those years but it takes much more effort, and is not as effective.

Suebeattie
11-04-2013, 08:22 AM
My cousin speaks to her children in english while her spanish husband speaks to them in spanish. Its amazing how they learn to understand and speak 2 languages at the same time.
I think if I knew another language I would try to teach zac some.

:wiggle:

Vikki
11-04-2013, 03:13 PM
I seem to remember its optimal for language until 11 or 12 years old, that's why we should be teaching our primary /elementary school children languages rather than waiting

Totally agree. The new curriculum coming in next year makes it statutory for ks2 (7-11) to do a modern foreign language.....strange as the government got rid of doing it a couple of years ago! I actually do an hour of french with my year 2s (age 6-7), every week and they love it! I'm not meant to as it's not officially on the curriculum, but we make the time :D

Britchick
11-04-2013, 04:58 PM
Totally agree. The new curriculum coming in next year makes it statutory for ks2 (7-11) to do a modern foreign language.....strange as the government got rid of doing it a couple of years ago! I actually do an hour of french with my year 2s (age 6-7), every week and they love it! I'm not meant to as it's not officially on the curriculum, but we make the time :D

That's great Vikki, I think they should give you back some freedom in the way you educate students, languages are right to teach for so many reasons!

Johnie
11-04-2013, 11:47 PM
I have noticed the interpreters before. My career is working with people with disabilities
so I am always aware of this and other things.

I know some basic signs and the alphabet but that's about it. At my last job, we had
2 people with various levels of hearing loss so there were always interpreters about.
They do such a fantastic job and are very much in demand! I tried to take an ASL course
in grad school but was woefully inadequate. I am not good at picking up new
languages :sorry:

I have always read lips. I had to have emergency surgery to remove my tonsils
and adnoids when I was 6. They had grown so large that the doctors said I would have
become deaf. So, I think that is the reason I read lips. I swear if someone
is covering their mouth or turned away from me I cannot hear them. But I have
no problems on the phone or when I've ben drinking :lol:

Vikki
12-04-2013, 09:45 AM
That's great Vikki, I think they should give you back some freedom in the way you educate students, languages are right to teach for so many reasons!

Well, they don't :D I just do it anyway ;)

Whilst we're on the subject, does anyone know of a makaton or sign language website or something where I can find translations? Reason I ask is that every year we do a 'summer entertainment' st school and I'm going to teach my class the song "You've got a friend in me" from Toy Story. I'd love to teach them how to sign the chorus as something a bit special.....

susanm
12-04-2013, 12:45 PM
Well, they don't :D I just do it anyway ;)

Whilst we're on the subject, does anyone know of a makaton or sign language website or something where I can find translations? Reason I ask is that every year we do a 'summer entertainment' st school and I'm going to teach my class the song "You've got a friend in me" from Toy Story. I'd love to teach them how to sign the chorus as something a bit special.....

try this one

http://www.signingsavvy.com/

there is another one out there i used....will post if i can find it...havent used in a while

susanm
12-04-2013, 12:47 PM
I have noticed the interpreters before. My career is working with people with disabilities
so I am always aware of this and other things.

I know some basic signs and the alphabet but that's about it. At my last job, we had
2 people with various levels of hearing loss so there were always interpreters about.
They do such a fantastic job and are very much in demand! I tried to take an ASL course
in grad school but was woefully inadequate. I am not good at picking up new
languages :sorry:

I have always read lips. I had to have emergency surgery to remove my tonsils
and adnoids when I was 6. They had grown so large that the doctors said I would have
become deaf. So, I think that is the reason I read lips. I swear if someone
is covering their mouth or turned away from me I cannot hear them. But I have
no problems on the phone or when I've ben drinking :lol:

i would suggest trying a non credit class at a local college...the classes move at a slower pace and usually just work on everyday words and phrases...thats where i started... the local college here had 6 levels...basic - basic ii -- intermediate - intermediate 2 -- etc and it was a cheap class too

Clarkkent
12-04-2013, 01:47 PM
As a sign language interpreter myself (British not American) I've always been a little jealous of the ones that get to work doing the shows in Disney.
Maybe I should take a sabbatical and move to Florida for six months.

Don't think Deafjeff would be impressed if I left without him though.

In terms of a website for anyone wishing to learn British Sign Language my friend recently set up www.signworldlearn.com

Certainly a lot better than Mr tumble who regularly confuses the sign for "happy" with a four letter word that starts with "f" .... No wonder he's smiling all the time!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Suebeattie
12-04-2013, 06:58 PM
Certainly a lot better than Mr tumble who regularly confuses the sign for "happy" with a four letter word that starts with "f" .... No wonder he's smiling all the time!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ha ha ha that's brilliant - I wonder if he makes other mistakes :D

:wiggle:

Johnie
12-04-2013, 08:32 PM
I have thought about taking a class at the community college but I don't know where I would find the time right now. I work. A lot. And I'm also working 1 class per quarter towards my doctorate. You know why they call it a terminal degree? Cause I will probably be dead before I finish it lol

Johnie
12-04-2013, 08:33 PM
As a sign language interpreter myself (British not American) I've always been a little jealous of the ones that get to work doing the shows in Disney.
Maybe I should take a sabbatical and move to Florida for six months.

Don't think Deafjeff would be impressed if I left without him though.

In terms of a website for anyone wishing to learn British Sign Language my friend recently set up www.signworldlearn.com

Certainly a lot better than Mr tumble who regularly confuses the sign for "happy" with a four letter word that starts with "f" .... No wonder he's smiling all the time!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

HA! That's exactly what I'm afraid of happening. I get in enough trouble with my actual mouth lol goodness knows what I might say with my hands

Tink
12-04-2013, 11:44 PM
I learned to sign at a School for the Deaf from a Deaf Instructor who was born deaf. She was wonderful and an excellent instruction. She refused to allow voice in her class.

One day I was in a huddle (there's a bit of trivia, who invented the football huddle?) with some other students and she came over and asked me if I was using my voice. With more than a pink face, I told her no. She asked what the huddle was about then, and I told her I was sharing "dirty sign" that I'd learned from a deaf friend. She said, "Oh. OK," and left! :lol: When I say "said" in reference to her, I mean signed. She did not use her voice and one of the many things I learned from her is that some deaf folks can use their voices better than others, just like some people draw better than others.

I no longer have as many people to sign with, nor do I have the opportunity to sign on a daily basis, so I've lost my speed, but I am still fluent. I have one deaf staff member left, and she really enjoys having a director with whom she can talk and get complete explanations for things in her own language.