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Watchinherskip
18-09-2008, 04:55 PM
Took my DW and DD out to see My Fair Lady at the Wells Theater in Norfolk last night. It was awesome. Well the story must be well known to most in here, but for those who don't know, a flower girl, Eliza with a terrific Cockney accent, is selected for a bit of an experiment. A professor Higgins is set to transform the poor, uneducated girl into a "lady" of proper means. Great music, wonderful story and to my American English ear, great dialects. So my daughter says after the play, I am going to be speaking with an English accent for days now. She said how she loves British accents. We start talking about how most Americans would buy anything that a Brit would hawk on television. :p015:

They we start talking about how we can do all the different British accents (Cockney to the upper crust ones) and guess that Brits can do American accents too. Right?;)

We do afterall speak the same language. Right? Dawn's post made me think otherwise...I had to read it over and over to think what is Boots..what is Woolies?

Johnie
18-09-2008, 05:23 PM
:lol: I was thinking about our UK friends last night too. But, I was watching a Barbara Walters special on the Royal Family.

mumof2
18-09-2008, 05:41 PM
boots (http://www.boots-the-chemists.co.uk/) and woolies (http://www.woolworths.co.uk/web/jsp/index.jsp) :lol:

Watchinherskip
18-09-2008, 06:18 PM
Thank you Mum! Now it is becoming clearer:p015:

Guess we could have our own version of Pygmalia here too with all the dialects from across the US...
Souther drawl
Brooklyn
Southie from Boston
Downeaster from Maine
Chicaago
I hate to even think about the dialet from my native Northeastern Pennsylvania
How about Sarah Palin's Alaskan/Minnesotan one?

It was interesting that Professor Higgins could tell the part of England the person on the street was from just by the dialect. He claimed in the show that he could get within 2 to 3 miles of where they were from. I wasn't trained to pick out the English dialect well, but I guess it could be done just as easily with American dialects. (Yes I do realize it was a play.:lol:)

Are there any American dialects that are more appealing to the British ear?

Watchinherskip
18-09-2008, 06:20 PM
:lol: I was thinking about our UK friends last night too. But, I was watching a Barbara Walters special on the Royal Family.

Yeah that would do it! Johnie when you read the posts to yourself, do you "hear" the voice with an accent? Just wondering:shrug:

Slowhand
18-09-2008, 07:23 PM
I recall when I used to visit the States quite a lot on business and very often someone [usually female] would say to me and my colleagues "I just love your accent".
After this happened a few times I found myself saying in response "Thank you, but I don`t have an accent. I speak English, it`s you who has the accent!"...this usually went straight over the head of the recipient! :lol:

Johnie
18-09-2008, 08:53 PM
Yeah that would do it! Johnie when you read the posts to yourself, do you "hear" the voice with an accent? Just wondering:shrug:

:lol: sometimes I do!

Tink
18-09-2008, 10:32 PM
One of my English professors, who was an English man, could do that also. Based on a person's accent, he could tell you where in the UK they are from. I can separate, England, from Wales, from Scotland, from Ireland, and maybe even pick out Cork from Galway from Dublin, but that's about it. Oh, and Der 'Pool of course, but everyone can pick that one out, eh?

Yes, same here too. I can tell where someone hail's from (or at least was raised) based on their accents. :yes: I have a weird one. It's traces of Maine with overlay of French Canadian, and Adirondacks. Thanks Gramps! :D :lol:

One of the funniest conversations I ever heard was between two Seabees. One was from Boston (North End) and the other was from the hills of Tennessee (can you say TWANG!!!)? Absolutely hysterical!

Dawn
19-09-2008, 07:12 AM
I love the Tennessee twang and my very favourite is the Mississippi drawl.

Skywatcher
19-09-2008, 08:25 AM
There are massive differences in local dialects in the UK - hard to explain on a forum but happy to talk to anyone on the phone for 1/2 an hour if they like.

But I don't have an accent, i speak the Queens English

MystikPiglit
19-09-2008, 12:23 PM
in Norfolk last night.

She said how she loves British accents. We start talking about how most Americans would buy anything that a Brit would hawk on television. :p015:


:wave:from the other Norfolk. :)

Accents story: DH and I were hurrying to catch a bus at DTD but he just went straight past the stop, leaving us and 3 girls standing there. I said, "Oh, bother!" and the girls laughed and started asking us where we were from and saying how much they loved our accents. They all practised saying, "Oh, bother!". :lol:

Tink
19-09-2008, 12:32 PM
LOL! Cute story MystikPiglit! I'm sure the girls loved the experience and are still out there somewhere saying "oh bother!" :D

Tennessee falls hard on my ears. Mississippi on the other hand is softer and more musical, as are the accents of the low country. :yes: I love the cajun accent as well as the Louisianna accent in general. :yes:

Skywatcher
19-09-2008, 12:34 PM
when we worked in Madison for a couple of months people actually stopped in the steet and stared at us as we went by :lol: In one mall some girls came up to us and said ' please talk to us- just say - anything'

it was quite bizzare - suppose they don't get many tourists in Madison

Tink
19-09-2008, 12:37 PM
That is a very good supposition. :lol:

There is a young woman working in one of my facilities who hails from Newcastle. The staff are constantly asking her to speak with them, because of her accent.

We had a private talk about the horrid use of English that she encounters, with her doing a particularly funny bit on the pronounciation of aKs for ask. I nearly cried with laughter. She said she didn't anyone to use the Queen's English, however did expect people to use the words they said, properly! :lol:

Can't agree with her more.

Johnie
19-09-2008, 02:56 PM
The accents vary in the different states as well. There are several types of accents in Virginia. Down in the southeastern part of the state, the accent is more pronounced. In Northern VA, they don't have an accent cause everyone is from outside of Virginia! I have a southern drawl but it's not too harsh unless I get mad. People who live in Chester have their own way of speaking. It's hard to explain unless your from here. Tidewater people have a different accent too. People who are from the area pronounce Norfolk like "Nawfulk". You can tell when people aren't from there b/c they pronounce Nor-folk hard on both syllables.

MystikPiglit
19-09-2008, 03:09 PM
People who are from the area pronounce Norfolk like "Nawfulk". .

:overhere:That's also how it's pronounced in the UK Norfolk. :D

Skywatcher
19-09-2008, 03:11 PM
Nah its more like Naar -fuk

MystikPiglit
19-09-2008, 03:12 PM
Nah its more like Naar -fuk

Only if you are a yokel...... :(

Johnie
19-09-2008, 03:12 PM
:lol: my dad says we all pronounce it like "No *insert bad word*"

ukwdwnut
19-09-2008, 03:18 PM
one cockney accent checkin in :D

i just love american accents, i did the welcome to epcot thing that you hear on the monorail in the same accent and the kids were always laughing god knows why :lol: