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View Full Version : My grandma's Red Velvet Cake Recipe



Johnie
15-12-2008, 09:35 PM
which is apparently called the Waldorf Astoria Cake :tongue:

Ingredients:

1/2 cup Crisco
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 bottles red food coloring
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs
2 tablespoons cocoa
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups plain flour
1 cup buttermilk
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon vinegar

Directions:

Sift flour
Mix cocoa in flour and salt
Cream shortening and sugar
Add eggs and vanilla
Add food coloring
Add sifted dry ingredients alternately with buttermilk
Mix vinegar and soda.....add to mixture while foaming

Bake at 350 degress for 20 to 25 minutes

Frosting:

1 cup milk
1/4 cup flour

cook until thick and then add a dash of salt and cool

Mix 1 cup of sugar, 1/2 cup Crisco, 1 stick margarine, 1 teaspoon vanilla......beat until fluffy

Then beat all ingredients together at high speed until fluffy.

mumof2
15-12-2008, 09:50 PM
mmm, Red Velvet - that sounds very luxurious Johnie :yes:


what's Crisco?

Johnie
15-12-2008, 09:55 PM
fat :tongue:

Crisco is a brand name of shortening made entirely of vegetable oil.

Britchick
15-12-2008, 09:57 PM
no photo of the finished cake? :unsure:

Johnie
15-12-2008, 09:58 PM
My grandma's cakes are always beautiful and taste delicious. Mine just taste delicious...I have no decorating skills :sorry:

Britchick
15-12-2008, 09:59 PM
same here Johnie, i'm more of a rustic cook! :lol:

Tink
15-12-2008, 10:04 PM
Johnie, I'm not a fan of Red Velvet Cake, but that sounds pretty darn good! :yes:

All but the frosting. :sorry: I'm not a frosting person at all. :sorry:

Crisco is hydrogenated vegetable oil. It's flavorless, so if you are trying to replace it with a product available in the UK, think lard (in color and consistency) but without the animal connection. :) Lard would not be a viable replacement for Crisco.

Nor would butter. Butter causes things to be thin and crispy, whereas Crisco caused baked goods to be soft and moist. Major difference. (Especially in cakes and cookies).

Johnie
15-12-2008, 10:05 PM
It should look something like this
This is what our wedding cake was.....Mike requested it.

Johnie
15-12-2008, 10:07 PM
Tink, you could always make the cake without the frosting :yes: It is a very dense, moist cake.

mumof2
15-12-2008, 10:17 PM
ahh thanks for the Crisco explanation - i panicked a bit when i saw the word 'lard' though! yuk...

the cake looks beautiful, wouldn't it be wonderful for me to serve it up for the family at Christmas day tea - a red cake, mmm! :yes:

i won't be though - i'd need lots of practice first, I'm a rustic cook too - that's the way proper homecooked food should be, at least that's *my* excuse! :lol:

Tink
15-12-2008, 10:19 PM
Yes, Johnie. :yes: I used to beg my Mother to not frost the cakes... every now and then she'd make one that was really dense and moist that didn't 'need' frosting. As far as I'm concerned no cake needs frosting! LOL. :D :D

But RV is very moist and would be great without frosting. :yes:

Lard is the only thing that I could think of that looks like the product. It's NOT a replacement as I said, but I was trying to give you a mental image. Crisco is smoother and creamier than lard.

mumof2
15-12-2008, 10:29 PM
Lard is the only thing that I could think of that looks like the product. It's NOT a replacement as I said, but I was trying to give you a mental image. Crisco is smoother and creamier than lard.


lard ~ shudder! :lol:


Crisco does ring a bell now - i wonder whether we have it here, there's bound to be something similar anyway I'm sure.

Tink
15-12-2008, 10:32 PM
Once I made all my pie crusts with lard. I thought I would do the "old fashioned" thing...

UGH. Nasty. I know folks like it, but to me it just tasted and smelled of pork. NOT the flavor (although I do like pork) I want with my banana cream, pumpkin, rhubarb, blueberry or apple pie! :lipwobble: Or any other pie for that matter.

lisaw
15-12-2008, 10:39 PM
I am so glad lard isn't used much now - I have memories of that awful smell from my childhood Sunday roasts :blech:

Beccaberry
15-12-2008, 10:41 PM
I suddenly have the biggest craving for some pie.....

Johnie
15-12-2008, 10:41 PM
Does Cookeen ring a bell with our UK folks?

Did a google search and came up with this

1 US cup = 236.588238 ml

Also
the term "shortening" can be used more broadly to apply to any fat, such as butter, lard, or margarine, used in baking, but as used in recipes it refers to a hydrogenated vegetable oil that is solid at room temperature. Shortening has a higher smoke point than butter and margarine, and it has 100% fat content, compared to 80% for butter and margarine. Crisco, a popular brand, was first produced in 1911. In Ireland and the UK Cookeen is a popular brand.

mumof2
15-12-2008, 10:49 PM
Does Cookeen ring a bell with our UK folks?

yep i *think* that sounds familiar Johnie, thanks :thumbsup:


i would so love to make this cake and wow everyone with it....i'll let you know if i get brave enough to try it!

Johnie
15-12-2008, 10:51 PM
The cake alone wows......if you can also make it pretty that is great. But it doesn't need to be.

Beccaberry
15-12-2008, 10:57 PM
YUMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMY!

Johnie
15-12-2008, 11:00 PM
Should I make this in OC then? :tongue:

lisaw
15-12-2008, 11:06 PM
Hydrogenated vegetable fats are being fazed out as an ingredient here in most things. It would be interesting to try the cake with a different type of (healthier) fat and see what the results would be.

It looks lovely :D

Beccaberry
15-12-2008, 11:08 PM
Yes please.

Listen to me. Are you listening to me? :wink:

Yes please.

Johnie
15-12-2008, 11:10 PM
:yes: I am always listening to you. I will bring the recipe with me!

Beccaberry
15-12-2008, 11:11 PM
Woohoo!!!

SleepinCatz
15-12-2008, 11:16 PM
That is in fact a spectacular recipe! My Grandmother had the same one and we still make it only that way :)

Johnie
15-12-2008, 11:17 PM
Your grandma and my grandma apparently nicked this from the Waldorf Astoria cookbook :tongue: I thought it was my grandma's recipe till today!

SleepinCatz
15-12-2008, 11:20 PM
yes indeed :) She sure did lol :) but is the BEST of all the recipes I have run across.

Johnie
15-12-2008, 11:22 PM
Yes, it is very, very good.

Tink
16-12-2008, 04:41 AM
I honestly don't know what could substitute for Crisco and yeild the same results. Hydrogenated fats are being replaced in many mass produced foods, true but I just don't know what a home cook could use.

No other liquid fat would work (in the same way).

Dawn
16-12-2008, 08:19 AM
We tend to use butter for baking in our house. You know where you stand with butter.

Mags
16-12-2008, 08:35 AM
Thank you Johnie! I have been looking forward to this. Thank you so much.

Margaret

Britchick
16-12-2008, 09:52 AM
i use butter to make cakes, the taste is so much better. I use lard sometimes for roast potatoes and i would if i ever made pastry as it gives a good texture. I'd much rather use natural fats even though they are higher in cholesterol- i hate all the additives.

Tink
16-12-2008, 12:15 PM
Well, I'm with you on the butter. :yes: I'll use that before margarine every time.

Still can't do the switch though (butter for Crisco) in my opinion. (I'm sure folks do though :yes: ). It's the texture thing.

Beccaberry
16-12-2008, 02:42 PM
So then. Shall we start taking orders for Crisco?

mumof2
08-01-2009, 12:31 PM
I spotted Cookeen on the shelf at the supermarket yesterday so I can definately use that yes? :unsure:

mumof2
08-01-2009, 12:34 PM
Should I make this in OC then? :tongue:


did you?

Johnie
08-01-2009, 02:52 PM
I didn't make the red velvet cake in OC. I did make my Christmas rock cookies.

According to google, cookeen is comparible to Crisco.

mumof2
08-01-2009, 02:56 PM
I didn't make the red velvet cake in OC. I did make my Christmas rock cookies.

According to google, cookeen is comparible to Crisco.

ok, well I'm too late to make it for Christmas I guess! I may try it if i'm feeling brave - I'll show you if I do, it does look fab doesn't it. :yes:

Johnie
08-01-2009, 03:25 PM
You can make a red velvet cake anytime. It's not for Christmas. My grandma made it for our wedding cake.

mumof2
08-01-2009, 05:22 PM
You can make a red velvet cake anytime. It's not for Christmas. My grandma made it for our wedding cake.


oh yes, I'd just thought before Christmas what a wow factor it would have for Christmas Day tea with the family!

Hey - yummy cakes are for *any* day! I may have to practice it many times before next Christmas! :yes:

Johnie
08-01-2009, 07:01 PM
You could always practice for Valentines Day

mumof2
08-01-2009, 07:40 PM
You could always practice for Valentines Day


hmmm, maybe......

mumof2
28-02-2009, 11:18 AM
ok, I'm starting to feel a little brave.....

*if* i make it myself i have a jug that has 'cup' measurements on it so if i just stick to that instead of trying to convert to metric that should work i guess.

also, the 2 bottles of red colouring - i have the small 38ml bottle would that be the right sort of size or is it not as precise as that?

oh, and are your tablesppons the same size as ours?

Johnie
28-02-2009, 05:40 PM
I can check on the food coloring when I go to the store.

I'm not sure about the tablespoon?

Maybe I should just send you some measuring cups/spoons?

mumof2
28-02-2009, 06:28 PM
I can check on the food coloring when I go to the store.

I'm not sure about the tablespoon?

Maybe I should just send you some measuring cups/spoons?

:hug2: thank you Johnie


1 Tablespoon [US] = 1.0408427 Tablespoon [UK] - so that's more or less the same, and the cup measurement on my jug is roughly what conversion amount you said earlier so i'll work on that and hope it turns out ok!


1 Teaspoon [US] = 1.3877903 Teaspoon [UK] - interesting