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Skywatcher
29-01-2009, 08:24 PM
:unsure:

Not sure if anyone will get this but he is 'into' his rubiks cubes at the moment - he can solve a traditional cube (3x3) in 80 seconds he can also solve a 2x2 a 4x4 and a 5x5 - now until recently the rule was you could go no higher that that due to basic laws of physics but a Greek chap has invented a whole new technology and last september the first ever 6x6 and 7x7 were released - Thomas had some money for xmas so he bought them ( !!!)

they came today and are obviously bonkers complex - I think on te 7x7 cube it said there are 1.95 x 10 190(should be superscript) combinations.

:unsure: it took him 10 minutes to do it.


I am running out of ways to stimulate his brain

mumof2
29-01-2009, 08:25 PM
oh my, how wonderful......where on earth do you go from here. :hug2:

Britchick
29-01-2009, 08:28 PM
:unsure: wow!!! i struggle to do one side of the rubiks cube!

Skywatcher
29-01-2009, 08:28 PM
I'm not sure, he is only 8 - maybe they could use him at Cern

I expect he knows whether schrodingers cat is dead or not

mumof2
29-01-2009, 08:31 PM
did you see that programme last night about genius children

Skywatcher
29-01-2009, 08:39 PM
we used to watch them all but then we decided we just wanted him happy for now, and for now he is - but he will get sooooooo bored

He has now learned Pi to 430 decimal places :eek: - I've tried to tell him that is more than he is ever likely to practicaly need :lol:

mumof2
29-01-2009, 08:45 PM
oh my goodness, I mean it's wonderful and I just know you're bursting with pride, but how scary is it Chris to have a child that is so incredibly intelligent.

josh.p.
29-01-2009, 08:46 PM
Jesus! He is super-clever. Tell him I'll give him a tenner to do my A-level coursework for me LOL

Skywatcher
29-01-2009, 08:48 PM
It scares the bejibbers out of me, it is a fantastic gift but it comes at a price as far as behaviour is concerned and his needs are just as 'special' as if his IQ was below average - unfortunately there is no provision at that end as far as the school is concerned so they just sit him by himself doing quadratic equations etc

Taja
29-01-2009, 08:53 PM
It scares the bejibbers out of me, it is a fantastic gift but it comes at a price as far as behaviour is concerned and his needs are just as 'special' as if his IQ was below average - unfortunately there is no provision at that end as far as the school is concerned so they just sit him by himself doing quadratic equations etc

Sounds familiar. School was a boring holding pen, for the most part. :sigh:

And I'm no where near as intelligent as he is!

mumof2
29-01-2009, 09:00 PM
It scares the bejibbers out of me, it is a fantastic gift but it comes at a price as far as behaviour is concerned and his needs are just as 'special' as if his IQ was below average - unfortunately there is no provision at that end as far as the school is concerned so they just sit him by himself doing quadratic equations etc


it's just wrong - there was a lad at my eldest sons first school who was super intelligent....the parents fought and fought for him as he was so bored at school and they just couldn't afford to send him for all the tests etc that were required in order to prove his intelligence.

daveann
29-01-2009, 09:00 PM
what a little treasure you have there as long as he is happy thats all that counts but i bet your so proud of him :)

Tink
29-01-2009, 09:02 PM
Oh dear G-d. The child needs are special and very complex!

He needs socialization, or so we think, eh? :unsure: Keeping him stimulated is the key.

Does he interact with other children his age when given the opportunity? :unsure:

Jaysus Doc. Maybe he's the one, eh?

foreverducky
29-01-2009, 09:03 PM
Wow! You must be such a proud parent! It is true, he is as "abnormal" as someone who is greatly below average. However, this would definitely be the side of the coin one would wish for. :D

That's so exciting! And if he isn't busy tonight, could he read my book on Cognitive and Affective processes and then give me the cliff notes version of it???? :D

mumof2
29-01-2009, 09:42 PM
oh i just remembered chris, I think the parents were trying to get their son statemented so he would get the help he deserved.

They have a gifted and talented department at my eldest sons high school but that's obviously a long way off for you.

As you say, you want to see him happy and he is still only a little one :hug2:

Beccaberry
29-01-2009, 10:11 PM
So then perhaps we should just send him America's checkbook...maybe he could balance it for us?

Ursula
30-01-2009, 12:23 AM
How wonderful and don't let him go to waste.

candyman
30-01-2009, 03:47 AM
wow just rejoice in him and make sure he knows how proud you are of him
steve

Dawn
30-01-2009, 07:40 AM
Has he taught himself Latin yet?

Seriously, get him a book on Latin.

Are there any forums out there for parents of scarily gifted children? :unsure:

Steven solved the traditional cube by taking all the stickers off and moving them around. A genius of a very different sort. :lol:

Skywatcher
30-01-2009, 08:08 AM
:lol: thats how I did it my parents were so proud of me , and so upset when they found out :sigh:

yes he socialises much much better now than he did, his music helps a lot - the problem is his peers are becoming less tolerant, but onlya little at the moment

candyman
30-01-2009, 08:11 AM
i googled help for very gifted children and there were lots of links
im sure you have already looked but if not it may help you
steve

Skywatcher
30-01-2009, 08:23 AM
It is a challenge because we could work his brain into a state of great advancement I have no doubt - but that would leave him utterly separated from his peers - I can't help feeling that he is different enough already - he is only young, we should just keep him on the straight and narrow at present and see how things pan out - I think awareness is half the battle really

Thanks though mate :thumbsup: we have had a look at those

Ursula
30-01-2009, 08:38 AM
See that's the thing on being a parent... there's no crystal ball :(

mumof2
30-01-2009, 08:54 AM
the programme that was on the other evening, i only saw a little of it - there was a young lad who was probably around the same age as your little man and his father pushed him and pushed him, but when his mother was interviewed she said something to the effect of "he's a child he should be doing things children do and the father shouldn't push him so much''

that's not a quote you understand - it was just something like that.

as others have said, rejoice be proud and be there for him all of which you are doing already! :hug2:

Tink
30-01-2009, 12:09 PM
I think one of the most important things that you do with your son, is to take his thoughts and desires into consideration. You allow him to define what is enjoyable, fun, social to and for himself, eh? :yes: That's half the battle right there. Intelligence is not interchangeable with maturity.

uscwest
30-01-2009, 01:27 PM
It definitely sounds like you have a genius at hand there Chris. How proud you must be of him. Do his teachers want to advance him in school?

Skywatcher
30-01-2009, 01:42 PM
They don't do that over here it is felt importsnat to keep peer groups together - TBH he is not mature enough to be jumped ahead - and like I said he is happy at the moment so inmany ways that is all that matters :thumbsup:

mumof2
30-01-2009, 01:50 PM
and like I said he is happy at the moment so inmany ways that is all that matters :thumbsup:

absolutely :hug2:

Dorothy
30-01-2009, 02:22 PM
he is happy at the moment so inmany ways that is all that matters

Very smart parents :thumbsup:

I got skipped in school and now when I look back it was so not the right thing to do. Back then though that was all that could be done as there were no special classes for kids like me.

When we started to have the same issues with Diane we signed her up for some enrichment classes that were offered by our local community college that she loved. If I remember right she took intro to oceanography and intro to geology. They weren't college level courses, but they were a challenge for her at age 10.

Is there something like that where you live that maybe you could get him into over the summer months?

Skywatcher
30-01-2009, 02:43 PM
he does his music and chess and learns a lot from the computer - intelligence is not celebrated as much as it seems to be in the US I'm afraid

Dawn
30-01-2009, 03:28 PM
We are scared of intelligence over here. I always think of that young girl that was a genuis at Maths and went to Oxford or Cambridge when she was 12 and had no childhood and has no idea how to live in the real world, etc etc etc.

Dawn
30-01-2009, 03:49 PM
Do you do things like this?

Sometimes me and Steven get into our jammies and snuggle under a duvet on the sofa and drink hot chocolate with marshmallows.

That's about being a boy. :D

Skywatcher
30-01-2009, 03:52 PM
He has never done much like that TBH. We read together and he gets very excoted about that - fiction or non fiction - he is happiest when he is on a roller coaster though - so I am sure we can do something about that sometime soon :D

josh.p.
30-01-2009, 04:18 PM
He has never done much like that TBH. We read together and he gets very excoted about that - fiction or non fiction - he is happiest when he is on a roller coaster though - so I am sure we can do something about that sometime soon :D
1 WEEK TO GO! Have you started dancing yet?

Dawn
30-01-2009, 04:24 PM
Chris doesn't dance. He stands in the middle of the room turning small circles while flapping his hands in a panic. :laugh:

Skywatcher
30-01-2009, 04:30 PM
:mental:

Dawn
30-01-2009, 04:35 PM
that's it!!! That's what he does. And Lisa does all the sorting and packing while he does it. :lol:

Skywatcher
30-01-2009, 04:38 PM
aw... you remembered :hug2:

Dawn
30-01-2009, 04:54 PM
It's a female thing. :lol:

Disneybumble
30-01-2009, 08:37 PM
Chris l feel for you because this blessing has it's drawbacks I am not clever enough to convey in words what l mean but in simple terms what l am trying to say is you see his needs and encourage them and see the drawbacks and do the absolute best to minimise them. How great that you are off to Disney and see it for all that it is and has to offer. I am sure some parents with such a special child as yours would see Disney as "dumbing down"and not what their child needs.
To you and Lisa for whatever the future holds for your DS.

Taja
30-01-2009, 11:09 PM
Very smart parents :thumbsup:

I got skipped in school and now when I look back it was so not the right thing to do. Back then though that was all that could be done as there were no special classes for kids like me.

When we started to have the same issues with Diane we signed her up for some enrichment classes that were offered by our local community college that she loved. If I remember right she took intro to oceanography and intro to geology. They weren't college level courses, but they were a challenge for her at age 10.

Is there something like that where you live that maybe you could get him into over the summer months?

We had the same issues, Dorothy. Lots of remedial attention, but nothing for those who were brighter. :sigh: And the community colleges had so many students that they didn't want any who weren't enrolled in a degree or pre-degree program. :shrug: I completed my high school coursework at 14, but my parents wouldn't allow me to graduate until 16. Social issues. Seriously doubt you had the social issues! :)

Chris, you and Lisa are being terrific parents by allowing your DS to be a child while encouraging him to develop his horizons. As you've said, he is happy and well-adjusted at the present. You'll work through all the challenges as they occur. :hug2:

Skywatcher
31-01-2009, 07:55 AM
He wents to his first Disco last night and was apparently mobbed by girls.

:sigh: he is already brighter than me and now he is more attractive as well :lol:

loadsapixiedust
31-01-2009, 11:24 AM
He wents to his first Disco last night and was apparently mobbed by girls.

:sigh: he is already brighter than me and now he is more attractive as well :lol:

That made me smile! :D I feel your pain! It's hard to handle when your kids are smarter than you and so much worse when they turn out better looking too!

Homework for us became a nightmare when DD was doing Uni level maths in P6/7 :unsure:

Seriously being gifted is as much a special educational need as being dyslexic or having autism and should be addressed by schools. The law provides for statementing of children with superior intelligence but this route is rarely taken. I think schools are frightened of bright kids.

In my DD's case her school had several gifted kids and they did regularly take a group of more able kids out for extra stimulation, they had visits to Universities where they sat in on lectures, they did tuition in mind mapping, project presentation and essay writing. They were all encouraged to present a project on a subject of their own choosing which allowed them to explore a topic that interested them is as much depth as they liked. They did a project with NASA. All this was at primary school level, at high school it all disappeared as resources were only directed at the disruptive kids :( DD left school and went to Uni a year early as she just couldn't stand it any more.

What was important was that they still enjoyed all the things that make them kids. If you can find the right mix between stimulation and socialisation then you have it made. The tendancy for a lot of these brighter kids is to become loners and that brings another set of problems with bullying etc.

All I wish is for your son to find a way to make good use of his gifts and to stay happy. You must be very proud.

BTW I can still only do a Rubik's Cube if I peel off the stickers so the greatest respect to him :worship:

Dorothy
31-01-2009, 01:48 PM
What it comes down to is going with what you and Lisa think is best and from what you are saying you're doing a great job :thumbsup: :hug2:

SleepinCatz
31-01-2009, 02:16 PM
My dh suggests getting erector sets or kinex...things he can design his own roller coasters with :)