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Johnie
13-03-2009, 12:57 AM
:sorry: I apologize to anyone I have offended with my criticism that corn bread should not be sweet and if it is then it is cake. It is MY OPINION only :yes: So, that being said, I went googling and this is what I found :tongue:

Learn how to make real Southern cornbread
By Diana Rattray, About.com



"First thing I do is put the grease in my iron skillet, then I put it in a hot oven......"

That's how every good Southern cornbread begins. If you've ever lived in the South, or if you've spent time chatting or exchanging email with a Southerner, you probably know how particular they are about their cornbread, and how proud every Southern cook is with his or her own method. Considered a staple here, real Southern cornbread is near and dear to the hearts of all.

Cornbread was being made by Native Americans long before the first Europeans settled the Americas. The earliest cornbreads were called "pone", from the Algonquin word "apan", and were a simple mixture of cornmeal, salt, and water. No one really knows why cornbread recipes differ so much between the Northern and Southern states. Northern cornbreads use significant amounts of sugar and flour, while Southern cornbreads use very little or none at all.

In the 1928 cookbook, "Southern Cooking," Mrs. Dull advises,
" If the batter is too thin, the muffins will be sticky; if too stiff, dry and tough. No flour is used in corn sticks, muffins or egg-bread. The real Southern cornmeal is sufficiently fine to hold the bread together. The bran is sifted from the meal."


Here in the South the supermarket shelves are stocked with a variety of cornmeal products, including self-rising meal, cornbread mixes and different grinds. If you can't find self-rising meal in your area, add 2 teaspoons of baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon of salt for each cup of regular meal.

Cornbread Tips:


•Sprinkle a little cornmeal in the hot pan before adding the batter. It will brown and add a crispier texture.

•For a crusty cornbread, make sure there is a good "layer" of oil or shortening in the pan.

•A tablespoon of mayonnaise can be substituted for the egg.

•You can use all cornmeal, or lessen the amount of flour in the recipe.

•Use muffin or cornstick pans (preferably iron), to vary the shape.

•Instead of baking, fry the batter like pancakes.
The recipes on the next page range from basic, traditional cornbreads to favorite dressed-up versions, corn muffins, spoonbreads, and more. Enjoy!


SOOOO...apparently southern cornbread usually begins with hot oil in a cast iron skillet.......the rest is up to the cook :yes:

Beccaberry
13-03-2009, 01:03 AM
OOOOH OOOOH!!! MY MOM DOES THAT! I love that sizzle sound :D

Beccaberry
13-03-2009, 01:04 AM
PS. You did NOT offend me. It's not like you busted on fried chicken or anything :D

Johnie
13-03-2009, 01:06 AM
You know, I can't make fried chicken to save my life. I also can't make my mama's corn bread :sorry:

I DO know how to make sweet tea :tongue:

Beccaberry
13-03-2009, 01:12 AM
I have learned that I don't have to *know* how to cook...I only have to *know* people who know how to cook :D

Johnie
13-03-2009, 01:14 AM
All good posts need a recipe or twelve :tongue:

This is similar to what my grandma makes

Buttermilk Cornbread

Cook Time: 20 minutes
Ingredients:
•1 cup cornmeal
•1/3 cup all-purpose flour
•1/4 teaspoon baking soda
•1 teaspoon baking powder
•1 teaspoon salt
•1 egg, beaten
•1 cup buttermilk
Preparation:
Combine dry ingredients; add beaten egg and buttermilk, mixing well. Pour into greased, heated 8-inch or 9-inch iron skillet. Bake at 400° for 20 minutes, or until lightly browned.
Buttermilk cornbread serves 8.

Southern Style Cornbread

Cornbread in the South is usually made without sugar, though some regions and many people do like to sweeten their cornbread a bit. It's often the subject of discussion and debate on the forum. I love it either way, but my husband won't even call it cornbread if it has the slightest hint of sugar. This cornbread, with 3 eggs, is a bit richer than most, and very tasty.

INGREDIENTS:
•2 cups yellow cornmeal
•1 1/2 cups flour
•2 teaspoons salt
•2 teaspoons baking powder
•1 teaspoon baking soda
•2 tablespoons sugar, optional
•3 eggs, beaten
•1 tablespoon vegetable, for skillet
•2 cups milk
•1/4 cup melted butter
•melted butter for brushing top
PREPARATION:
Preheat oven to 425°. Put oil or shortening in a 10-inch iron skillet and place in the oven to preheat while making batter.
In a mixing bowl, combine cornmeal, flour, salt, baking powder, soda, and sugar, if using.

In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, and butter. Combine with dry ingredients and stir until all ingredients are moistened. Batter will be like a thick pancake batter.

Carefully, with heavy oven mitts, lift skillet out and turn to coat all of the inside surface with oil. Pour in batter and return to oven. Bake for about 20 to 25 minutes, until browned. A toothpick inserted in center should come out clean.

Johnie
13-03-2009, 01:15 AM
I have learned that I don't have to *know* how to cook...I only have to *know* people who know how to cook :D

:yes: seriously. I will eat anything you put in front of me as long as I don't see a face looking back :tongue:

Johnie
13-03-2009, 01:17 AM
This one sounds like it would make me happy :yes:

Bacon and Cheese Cornbread

Ingredients:
•1 package corn muffin mix (i.e., Jiffy)
•1/2 cup grated sharp Cheddar cheese
•6 slices crisply cooked and crumbled bacon
•1 egg
•milk, as label directs
Preparation:
Empty corn muffin mix into a medium mixing bowl. Save about 1 tablespoon of shredded cheese and bacon for topping; stir remaining cheese and bacon into muffin mix. Mis in egg and milk, following label directions. Pour batter into a greased and floured 8-inch square baking dish. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes; sprinkle reserved cheese and bacon over top and bake 10 minutes longer, or until cornbread browned and firm.

Hex
13-03-2009, 01:18 AM
:yes: seriously. I will eat anything you put in front of me as long as I don't see a face looking back :tongue:

deep fried chicken butt, with a side-salad? :)

Johnie
13-03-2009, 01:19 AM
:tongue: well beef butts aren't really butts so maybe a chicken butt isn't either

Beccaberry
13-03-2009, 01:24 AM
deep fried chicken butt, with a side-salad? :)

:laugh: :laugh:

And a diet coke.

Tink
13-03-2009, 04:14 AM
I believe they call that the Parson's nose. :yes: Seriously! :lol:

My grandmother (and now I) always started with Crisco melted in the skillet. :yes: Sophie (my friend from Texas) did too. :yes:

Johnie
13-03-2009, 04:15 AM
Something about Crisco or lard that makes things taste so good :yes:

PsychoAlice
13-03-2009, 04:15 AM
LARD....

Tink
13-03-2009, 04:18 AM
Eeeeeewwww. Lard smells too much like pig. :sorry: I can't stand the smell of that stuff melting, or pie crust that's been made with it, baking... or the taste of it. Tastes like rancid grease with a hint of strong bacon to me.

Well now, doesn't that just sound appetizing? :sorry:

PsychoAlice
13-03-2009, 04:20 AM
My mom makes snikkerdoodles with it...

Johnie
13-03-2009, 04:20 AM
lard IS rancid grease with a hint of bacon :tongue: at least it always was in my house.

BevW
14-03-2009, 12:57 AM
I'm a "sugar" in the cornmeal batter person. I've always made it that way..but it's only
1/4 cup sugar..so it's not really sweet. I inherited my MIL Mom's iron skillet...it's a Griswold from Erie Penn. I love that thing..makes the BEST cornbread ever.
Now my fried chicken is what my family will walk over hot coals for! :lol:

Tink
14-03-2009, 12:59 AM
Oh! Oh! Oh! I have a Griswold, Bev! :yes: Wicked best skillet in the world! :yes:

I used to have a two chicken skillet. It was a monster. I ended up selling it when we relocated to Florida.

PsychoAlice
14-03-2009, 01:07 AM
:sniff: I have my grandmothers cast iron skillets that were used when she bought them after her and my poppa got married..and they were married for 65 years..those things are smoother than baby behind on the bottom and are VERY thin...another funny story about them though...

My grandmother broke one of the handles off in about 1958...at that time my poppa was working out at Edwards AFB...he took it in and hand one of the guys who was working with NASA and they welded it back on..

Do you know how difficult it was to weld cast iron in 1958? and its a gold color..none of us know what it is...but there is sits..50 years later..

She used those things EVERY DAY...

Taja
14-03-2009, 02:56 PM
:sniff: I have my grandmothers cast iron skillets that were used when she bought them after her and my poppa got married..and they were married for 65 years..those things are smoother than baby behind on the bottom and are VERY thin...another funny story about them though...

My grandmother broke one of the handles off in about 1958...at that time my poppa was working out at Edwards AFB...he took it in and hand one of the guys who was working with NASA and they welded it back on..

Do you know how difficult it was to weld cast iron in 1958? and its a gold color..none of us know what it is...but there is sits..50 years later..

She used those things EVERY DAY...

:hug2:

I'm that way about my mother's cookware--although I don't use it very often! And I'm keeping her china and porcelain tea set. And sterling flatware. :)

I think I'm finally at the point where I can part with a good portion of the cookware, but will save a few pieces that I really use and have special memories. I love her copper-clad stainless skillet and Dutch oven, and I use some of her Corningware (remember the cornflower pattern?) periodically. I just don't need six 1.5 to 3 qt. pots, plus a skillet (did you know Corningware made a skillet at one time?), Dutch oven and 8 mini pans (they range from 2 to 4 cups). There probably is more that I don't remember off the top of my head. She had three sauce pans with lids, the removable handle and brass cradles, then my cousin DC and his wife gave her a huge set on top of that! :eek: She bought the originals in the late 50s or early 60s, then received the gift set in the early 70s.