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Thread: Taking photos of animals

  1. #1
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    Ive been looking at some of the incredible photos on here from you all britchick, isafari, shogun, magicalmoments and everyone else how do you take a photo so that the animal is sharp but everything else is faint so the animal stands out?



  2. #2
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    thank you disneymom thats nice of you to say, i really think i need lots more practice:p015:

    do you have an slr?














  3. #3
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    whats an slr? i have a digital but not sure what type



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by disneymom, post: 33376
    whats an slr? i have a digital but not sure what type
    SLR means Single Lens Reflex where you actually view the subject through the lens of your camera. SLR cameras have interchangeable lenses to offer a much greater scope of the type of shots you can take.
    It`s really all a matter of focusing on the subject. If you have a "portrait" setting on your camera [whether SLR or not], try using this and focus on your subject and the background will be slightly blurred with your subject in sharp focus. This works best if you are fairly close to your subject.





  5. #5
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    and the further you are away from the background the better. I got some good results with my canon powershot but not as good as the slr.














  6. #6
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    Hello,
    If you want to get your animals in focus and the background blurred you need to shoot at the lowest Aperture setting (F Stop) your lens will allow you. Ideally, if your shooting an animal outdoors in a park or on safari, you will probably shoot with a 70-200mm F2.8 or F4 lens so that everything behind the animal is blurred to stop making it look less distracting.

    This also works well when shooting through a wire fence if you press the lens up to it, as it will blur the fence in the front, and focus on the animal.
    Cj.

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